What Is Alex Koyfman’s NH3 Ammonia (Oil Killer) Stock Pick?

Alex Koyfman of Angel Publishing recently released a presentation about a “little-known fuel,” which he claims has nothing to do with batteries, hydrogen, or nuclear fusion, that could hand investors up to 11,300%. And he calls this fuel the “Oil Killer.”

After looking into Alex’s claims more closely, I learned that what he’s referring to is ammonia, a compound of nitrogen and hydrogen with the formula NH₃.

Specifically, Alex is referring to an innovation around the production of ammonia, which he claims could be used to power vehicles, aircraft, and cruise chips. And the reason he refers to it as an “Oil Killer” because he believes it could disrupt the global oil market.

In this post, I’ll walk you through my take on Alex Koyfman’s prediction, share my guess on which stock I think he’s interested in, and give you the heads up on the advisory he’s pitching.

Is the “NH3 Revolution” a 100X Opportunity?

At the beginning of the presentation, we are shown a patent application document that, according to Alex Koyfman, contains “shocking details about what may be the most important energy innovation of the past 100 years.”

Alex claims that the invention the document relates to was developed in cooperation with the University of Ontario and that “one sub-$1 Toronto-based company is behind it all.”

According to Koyfman, the company is preparing a full-scale product launch that, once released, could disrupt the $3.3 trillion fossil fuel market and “unlock an unlimited supply of cheap zero-emission fuel.”

That’s an exciting prospect from both an environmental and investment point of view, but is what exactly is this invention, and will it be as disruptive as Alex claims?

To answer the first question, the invention has to do with producing ammonia.

In the presentation, Koyfman points out that nitrogen is the most abundant element in the Earth’s atmosphere and the most important plant nutrient.

However, no one knew how to harvest it until 1909, thanks to the Haber–Bosch process, a process where nitrogen is converted into ammonia (NH₃)

Long story short, this was a Nobel Prize-winning discovery, and as Alex points out, ammonia can also power internal combustion and jet engines. And, unlike fossil fuels, ammonia doesn’t release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, which makes it more environmentally friendly.

Why aren’t cars already running on it, then?

Alex explains that, while the Haber-Bosch is great, making NH3 (ammonia) “requires enormous amounts of heat, pressure, and fossil fuels — such as coal, oil, or natural gas.”

So, it appears as though the existing ammonia creation process negates the potential environmental benefits and isn’t economically feasible.

However, according to Koyfman:

“…one inventor from a small town in Ontario found a way to produce NH3 without using any fossil fuels at all.”

“His machine generates it from nothing but air and water.”

So, to recap, here’s what we know so far…

Alex Koyfman is bullish on a Canadian company that he claims has invented a machine that produces ammonia without using fossil fuels. And because ammonia can power internal combustion engines, he believes this invention could “cripple the $3.3 trillion fossil fuel market” while handing investors a significant return within a few years. Here’s how Alex puts it:

“As I said earlier, a return of 100 times your investment in the coming 2–3 years is not unrealistic.”

“I’m required to temper my enthusiasm for legal reasons, of course. The reality is, I believe that even that 100x projection is conservative.”

That’s a bold prediction, and there’s no guarantee that any investment will make you 100 times your money. Still, I wanted to know what company he was teasing, so I did some digging, and in the next section, I’ll show you what I learned.

What “Tiny Toronto Startup” Is Koyfman Teasing?

Based on what Alex Koyfman states in the presentation, he’s bullish on a small Canadian company that makes an ammonia-producing machine.

According to Koyfman, the machine was invented by an engineer named Roger, and, thanks to the machine he built, which sits in his garage, his Ford F-350 now runs on ammonia.

How does the machine work?

According to Koyfman:

“The machine Roger built is continually sucking air in to take the nitrogen and sucking water in to take the hydrogen.”

“Patent-protected technology combines both elements in a cylinder to produce ammonia.”

The machine requires electricity to run, but Alex Koyfman states that this is what makes the opportunity so exciting. And the reason, according to Koyfman, is that with the rise of solar and wind power, one of the main issues many countries are facing is energy storage.

It goes without saying that the sun doesn’t shine, and the wind doesn’t blow all day. So, energy storage is becoming more important and Alex believes this machine could be the solution.

“The fridge-size machine you’ve seen can take excess electricity and transform it into ammonia.”

“When there’s no sun or wind, that ammonia can be fed into thermal power stations to produce zero-emission electricity.”

What company makes this machine?

Well, to answer that, let’s look at a summary of the remaining clues Alex shares:

“This disruptive invention was developed in cooperation with the University of Ontario, and one sub-$1 Toronto-based company is behind it all.”

“You see, the company taking this breakthrough to the market is tiny. As of this publication, the stock was trading at a barely $15 million market cap.”

“And right now, this company is finalizing Phase IV to further improve system efficiency while lowering capital and operating costs.”

With these clues on hand, the first thing I did was Google “Toronto-based company ammonia machine,” which brought up a couple of relevant sites.

From there, it became apparent that a company called Green NH3 was a match.

According to the company website, “Green NH3 is a patented, refrigerator sized machine that manufactures green, sustainable ammonia (NH3) fuel from air and water,” and the machine was invented by a man named Roger Gordon, who converted his Ford F350 to use ammonia fuel.

I haven’t verified everything Alex said about the company, but I believe this is the Canadian company he’s referring to in the presentation, without a doubt.

But Green NH3 is a private company.

So I continued my research and came across an article on stockgumshoe.com, which led me to a company called Fuel Positive Corporation (ticker NHHH or NHHHF).

In short, EEStor Corporation acquired Green NH3 in 2020 before changing its name to Fuel Positive Corporation. So, while I’m not 100% certain, it appears as though the company Alex Koyfman is recommending is Fuel Positive since it acquired Green NH3.

As of writing, Fuel Positive has a market cap of around $45 million (OTC), which is higher than the “barely $15 million market cap” Alex mentioned. But the stock has rallied over the past year or so, and it is currently trading at just under 15 cents per share.

So, that’s my guess. However, if you want to find out for sure which stock Alex Koyfman’s teasing, you’d need to sign up for his Microcap Insider service.

Because, as with most of these presentations, the details of the investment are contained in a research report that comes with a subscription to a paid service.

In this case, the report is titled “The NH3 Revolution: How a Tiny Toronto Startup Beat a $3.3 Trillion Industry,” and it comes with a subscription to Microcap Insider.

How Does Microcap Insider Work?

I’ve written about this service before, so if you want all the details about how it works, I recommend checking out my complete Microcap Insider review.

That said, in short, Microcap Insider is a stock advisory run by Alex Koyfman of Angel Publishing that’s focused on small technology companies.

In particular, the service aims to find investment opportunities in micro-cap stocks, U.S. publicly traded companies with a market cap of between $50 million to $300 million.

The types of companies Alex recommends are typically technology or biotechnology companies that he believes could provide his followers with significant returns in the years ahead.

One year’s access to Microcap Insider will cost $1,999 if you join through the presentation, and while that is a discount off the regular price, it’s not exactly cheap. There’s also a considerable amount of risk involved with speculating in micro-cap stocks.

Still, Angel Publishing is a well-known financial publishing company, and according to the company website, the service comes with a 90-day refund policy. And if what Alex Koyfman says is anything to go by, he’s picked numerous triple-digit stocks over the years.

Bottom Line

The NH3 ammonia stock Alex Koyfman talks about in the presentation appears to be related to Roger Gordon’s invention of the Green NH3 machine, which creates ammonia without using fossil fuels. And the stock he’s bullish on could be Fuel Positive since it acquired Green NH3 in 2020.

Assuming I’m right, whether or not this would be a good investment is not something I’ll speculate on here since I don’t provide stock tips or investment advice. However, what I can say is that the technology itself seems interesting.

The idea of turning water and air into energy, much less storable energy, is something I’m keen to see develop from an environmental point of view. And at the very least, after going through the FAQ page on the Green NH3 website, it looks like a worthy contender to hydrogen fuel.

So it will be interesting to see how it develops going forward. The only thing I wonder is how this sort of technology would fare in the event of global water shortages.

What do you think? Is ammonia the next fuel source? And if you’ve joined Microcap Insider, how has the service worked for you? Let us know in the comments below.

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