WAH Program Review: Legit Work At Home Opportunity or Scam?

The idea of working at home is an exciting prospect for many.

But with so many scams online, it can be difficult to know what to trust. Well, you are smart for doing your homework on the WAH Program because it’s not quite as advertised!

In this review, I’ll show you what I found to help you make a more informed decision.

WAH Program Review

The WAH Program domain (wahprogram.com) was registered anonymously in November 2014 and claims to help people make money posting links.

It is supposedly run by a woman named Bobbie Robinson…

Bobbie Robinson

The story goes… she was a struggling single mother living paycheck to paycheck when she was laid off from her 9-5 job. Until “she had a chilling day that changed her life” and start posting links which changed her life.

Only it didn’t, because this is a fictional story presented by a fictional character.

Really? Yes.

Not to mention, link posting is not a real job or business. It’s something these people made up to convince you to whip out your credit cards. Plain and simple.

Now, those are some bold claims so before we get into the program itself, allow me to prove it to you.

The ‘Cookie Cutter’ Link Posting Scam Continues

For starters, the WAH program is one of many similar programs that all promote the same thing. Everything from the story, the characters and the testimonials are rehashed from one version to the next.

Here’s the logo for the WAH Program:

WAH Program Logo

Now here’s two identical sites that sell the same program:

WAH Edu Logo
WAH Institute Logo

Crazy right? Yep.

Clearly all three of these sites are identical. And as mentioned, Bobbie Robinson is a fictional character they made up.

Here’s proof:

Previous Bobbie Robinson

As you can see, they use the same content and name, but switch up the stock photos!

When you start digging deep into this (as I have) you will learn that there are literally hundreds of identical and slight variations of these sites.

Many have been shut down, but more simply take their place. It’s elaborate to say the least!

No legitimate business operates in this manner. Period. This is what scammers do to keep scams running long after each individual site is shut down.

Has It Really Been Featured On The News?

No. A common tactic they use is ‘pretending’ to have an endorsement from the news.

Weekly Jobs Report Fake News

The above page is designed to resemble a real news article. But it’s true purpose is getting people to click on any link (even the weather link) which leads them right to the sales page.

This is known as an advertorial, but it’s a super unethical one if you ask me.

Anyways, once you land on the sales page, you are greeted with the typical news logos:

Fake News Endorsements

What they are really saying is… “work at home opportunities” have been featured in the news. In other words, it’s nothing more than a general statement.

They have just carefully worked this into the sales material to give people the impression it has been featured/ endorsed by the news. It has not, is not, and will never be. I can assure you of this.

This is often accompanied by generic and overused news videos like this one:

Generic News Video

The news video is real, yes. But it has nothing to do with this program. It’s a general ‘work from home’ news segment. That’s it.

With tactics like this it makes it hard to believe they are genuinely out to help you. Rather, they are trying to take advantage of you by building false credibility.

How They Contradict Their Own Story

If you’ve read this far, you can see that this is quite an elaborate setup.

But we’ve really only scratched the surface.

We’ve discussed the many identical websites already. But also worth noting is how they us several different versions of the sales page on each website.

From a marketing perspective, there’s nothing wrong with ‘testing’ different pages like this. But when one version completely contradicts the others it makes you wonder what to really believe.

Anyway, here’s three different versions of the WAH Program to show you what I mean…

WHA Program Sales Page- Version 1

This version (wahprogram.com) is very much about building an affiliate marketing business.

WAH Sales Page- Business Version

The videos are quite basic and general in nature, nothing you couldn’t learn for free online.

This is the least ‘scammy’ version out of them all and targets people who are ready to build a business. In terms of a sales page, there’s not a lot wrong with this.

It’s only after stumbling across the following pages that the truth starts to reveal itself.

WAH Program Sales Page- Version 2

This sales page (wahprogram.com/1nvs) features a video of a woman who claims to be Bobbie Robinson. Yes, this is the third person who claims this!

To cut a long story short, she says she’s been making well over $10k per month posting links.

I’m sorry, but I don’t believe her story…

WAH Program Video Sales Page

Not surprisingly, they use the same video across their network of scam sites:

WAH Edu Video Sales Page
WAH Institute Video Sales Page

In any case, it turns out she’s really just an actress from a website called Fiverr:

Actress From Fiverr

To be clear, this is nothing against the actress herself. She is just doing her job.

But it goes to show the lengths these people will go to in order to mislead people into believing this is legit. The video itself is full of hype and claims you can make lot of money very quickly. Same old BS most scams run with.

WAH Program Sales Page- Version 3

This version (wahprogram.com/program-available.php) is the bread and butter of this operation, and the most common version of all.

This page claims WAH Program is actually a “job” and that is pays you hundreds per day. Very quickly and with little effort. All you need to do is sign up, start posting links and watch the money roll in! Righto.

Here’s exactly how they describe the program on this page:

…A legitimate, proven, and easy work at home job opportunity that can make your financial dreams come true

Hmmmmm….

Kind of strange how they claim WAH is a “job” on this page, yet say it’s a “business” elsewhere. Which is it?

More Fake Testimonials

I was pretty sure the testimonials were bogus, but I did some digging to be sure.

The images on ‘version 3’ weren’t working for some reason as you can see below. But they use the same testimonial between multiple sites so it’s plain to see they are one and the same.

Fake Testimonial Regina WAH
Fake Testimonial Regina WAH Edu

Apparently Regina has given the same testimonial for two different programs. More like they write the testimonial once, and paste it across all of their cookie cutter duplicate sites!

In any case, Regina is a stock photo:

Stock Photo Regina

I checked all of the testimonials on the page and as expected, they are all fake.

The Underlying Truth…

Paying the $97 is one thing, but your dealings with this company is far from over.

What do I mean?

For starters, these people plan on contacting you via phone, email and even direct mail to convince you to purchase much higher ticket programs. In some cases, well into the $10,000’s!

These interconnected link posting sites (in general) have ripped people off to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars.

I am not kidding. In this review of Home Job Placement, you will see exactly what I’m talking about and how the FTC itself has taken action on these types of sites.

To make matters worse, they also plan on sharing (likely even selling) your personal information to other marketers.

Privacy Policy

If you sign up, prepare yourself for a barrage of SPAM from them and whoever they give your information to. Not cool.

Conclusion

Unfortunately, there’s not a lot of good to say about this program.

They rely on fake news endorsements, sneaky sales tactics and fake testimonials to push a fake link posting “job”.

You can make money online as an affiliate marketer using ‘affiliate links’. Yes. But the REAL process is entirely different to how they make out. As in, worlds apart.

They grossly oversimplify the process to the point it’s an outright lie.

For starters, no one pays anyone to post links. A company pays an affiliate when they get people to buy through their affiliate link.

Second, you need real training, tools and support to earn money as an affiliate. Like any business, you need to learn the process and apply yourself in order to get results.

Push button solutions do not exist, so a good rule of thumb it to avoid anything claiming to be one. If it sounds too good to be true and they don’t explain the facts before asking for money, run for the hills.

In any case, I cannot recommend this program in good conscience.

Read next:Ā How I make over $10K p/m in passive online income (4-step formula)

9 thoughts on “WAH Program Review: Legit Work At Home Opportunity or Scam?”

  1. I experienced the same thing with Legendary Marketer. It cost me big bucks to find out the SAME THING. Just to spend money on bigger ticket items THINKING I WOULD MAKE BIGGER MONEY when I hadn’t even made ANY money yet. I’m still paying on the debt I incurred 1-1/2 years ago. MLM!!! Don’t go for them!

    Reply
  2. Do you know of any work at home programs that are not a scam? If so I would appreciate you letting me know which site it is.

    Reply
    • Wealthy Affiliate is legit and something I wholeheartedly recommend. It’s also free to get started.

      With that being said, it’s not a work at home program, it’s a platform that shows you how to start an online business. So it may not be what you’re looking for, but it is legit and it does work, so worth checking out if you’re looking to get started online.

      Hope this helps. šŸ™‚

      Reply
  3. Hello,
    This is definitely a SCAM do not send any money and or sign up for this program.
    There is a cost to enroll and for the website. The mentor that is assigned to you only
    wants to have you sign up for yet another program “Wine Program” yes additional
    money to join that program. I joined back on 9/4/17 to this date I have not even made one cent.
    Was very skeptical in joining this program but gave it a chance. All the testimonial’s are false. Rory Ricord (skype user – roryricord.com)states he will refund you the money you invested and an additional $500.00 if you do not make any money. Well for over two months now I have been trying to get back my money and have been unsuccessful.
    I want a check set out for all the money I invested and the additional $500.00 ASAP!

    Reply
    • Hi Susan,

      Thanks for sharing your experience with us, I’m sure many people are going to find this helpful.

      I actually reviewed Rory Ricord’s Link Post Blogging program a while back. Even though (I believe) the review was objective and fair, he tried his best to discredit it. He insisted that the $500 guarantee is legitimate and that he has no part in known link posting scam sites either. But the more comments I receive from people, the less inclined I am to believe that.

      In any case, it may be worth submitting your complaint on the BBB website to warn others about your experience. Not only can you help others this way, but it’s also a god way to get the attention of the company and get what you are rightfully owed.

      Thanks again for commenting, and all the best with things moving forward.

      Reply
  4. I’m retired and looking for part-time working @ home on the computer. Been looking 4 a long time maybe this site is one that not a scam.

    Thank You

    harold Wolf they call me (BOB)

    Reply

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